Patient Safety Solutions

Comprehensive solutions to support your efforts to address infection risk factors

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Overview

BD delivers comprehensive solutions to support your efforts to address infection risk factors.

Day in and day out, you strive to provide the highest quality care and improve the lives of patients. However, HAIs constantly threaten to undermine your best efforts. We believe the best care for HAIs is the care you never have to provide.

From clinically backed programs and products to advanced informatics and analytic tools, we help you standardize technologies, processes and practices to reduce care variation.

Challenges

HAIs continue to be one of the most common complications of hospital care.

  • 1 in 31 hospital patients has at least one HAI*, 1

  • ~1 in 10 patients with an HAI died during their hospitalization in 2015 *, 2

  • Average length of stay in the​ hospital increased by ~17 days for patients with an HAI †, 3

  • ~42% of patients with an HAI are readmitted within 30 days†, 3

  • ~1/3 of U.S. hospitals have been penalized at least once since the onset of HAC Reduction Program4

Risk Factors

Many healthcare-associated infections are preventable

Implementing evidence-based prevention strategies can lead to up to a 70 percent reduction in certain HAIs.‡, 5

A urinary tract infection (UTI) is an infection involving any part of the urinary system, including urethra, bladder, ureters, and kidney.6 75% of UTIs acquired in the hospital are associated with a urinary catheter, which is a tube inserted into the bladder through the urethra to drain urine.6

Between 15-25% of hospitalized patients receive urinary catheters during their hospital stay.6 Each day the indwelling urinary catheter remains, a patient has a 3-7% increase risk of acquiring a CAUTI.7

The most important risk factor for developing a catheter-associated UTI is prolonged use of the urinary catheter.6

A central line is a catheter that doctors often place in a large vein in the neck, chest, or groin to give medication or fluids or to collect blood for medical tests.7 A CLABSI is a serious infection that occurs when germs (usually bacteria or viruses) enter the bloodstream through a central line.7

CLABSIs result in thousands of deaths each year and billions of dollars in added costs to the U.S. healthcare system.8 On average, up to 82 patients a day in the U.S. acquire a CLABSI.9 Of patients who get a bloodstream infection from having a central line, up to 1 in 4 die.10

Substandard catheter care, such as excessive manipulation of the catheter, is associated with an increased risk for CLABSI.11

A surgical site infection is an infection that occurs after surgery in the part of the body where the surgery took place.7 Surgical site infections can involve the skin only, more serious infections can involve tissues under the skin, organs, or implanted material.7

SSIs occur in 2%-5% of patients undergoing inpatient surgery.11 Approximately 160,000-300,000 occur each year in the U.S.11 Up to 60% of SSIs have been estimated to be preventable by using evidence-based guidelines.11

Surgical risk factors include prolonged procedures and inadequacies in either the surgical scrub or the antiseptic preparation of the skin.12

Clostridioides difficile (also known as C. diff) is a bacterium that causes life-threatening diarrhea and colitis (an inflammation of the colon).13

Nearly 223,900 people in the U.S. required hospital care for C. diff and at least 12,800 people died in 2017.14 C . diff infections can increase hospital length of stay by 2.8-5.5 days.11

Poor antibiotic prescribing practices put patients at risk for C. diff infections.15

CRE stands for carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae.16 Enterobacteriaceae are a large family of different types of bacteria that commonly cause infections in healthcare settings.17 A subset of CRE, called carbapenemase-producing CRE (CP-CRE), are currently believed to be primarily responsible for the increasing spread of CRE in the U.S.16

In 2017, CRE caused an estimated 13,100 infections in hospitalized patients, and 1,100 estimated deaths in the U.S.14 Infections caused by these organisms are associated with high mortality rates among hospitalized patients, up to 50% in some studies.16

CRE are transmitted from person to person, often via the hands of healthcare personnel or through contaminated medical equipment.16

MRSA stands for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a type of bacteria that is resistant to several antibiotics.18

In 2017, MRSA caused an estimated 323,700 cases in hospitalized patients, and 10,600 estimated deaths in the U.S.14 About one in three people carry S. aureus bacteria in their nose.19

People who carry MRSA but do not have signs of infection can spread the bacteria to others.18

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Take a collaborative approach


            

Overview Overview
Overview
Assess Assess
Assess
Improve Improve
Improve
Maintain Maintain
Maintain
  • Identify and prioritize improvement areas 
  • Coordinate clinical support programs 
  • Measure and sustain performance
Review current practices, policies and technologies to establish a baseline and track performance.
Create a joint implementation plan based on recommendations from baseline assessment of how BD solutions can address identified gaps and improve performance in people, processes and technologies.
Sustain best practices through hospital champions, performance dashboards and ongoing education and training.
Urological drainage management
Urological drainage management

Address errors and variations in BARD Foley catheter usage by focusing on product training and education

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Vascular access management
Vascular access management

Advance vascular access care by helping to reduce complications for peripheral and central intravenous (IV) access

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Surgical solutions
Surgical solutions

Help increase patient safety and lower costs through improved surgical processes

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Diagnostic accuracy and efficiency
Diagnostic accuracy and efficiency

Set the patient on the right clinical path through timely and accurate diagnosis

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HAI informatics and analytics
HAI informatics and analytics

Highlight and prioritize improvement opportunities, track interventions and outcomes to help inform process improvement, and empower clinician-led patient outcomes

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Resources
Training
Infection control training from SHEA and BD
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References

* Results from the U.S. in 2015

† Results from one state in the U.S. in 2010

‡ Results from the U.S. in 2011

  1. U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, HAI Data. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/hai/data/index.html. Last reviewed: October 5, 2018.
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. FAQs about HAI Progress Report. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/hai/data/portal/FAQs-progress-report.html. Last updated October 25, 2018. Accessed December 10, 2018.
  3. Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council (PHC4). The Impact of Healthcare-associated Infections in Pennsylvania 2010. Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council (PHC4). Accessed: Feb 2012
  4. Kaiser Health News (KHN). Preeminent Hospitals Penalized Over Rates Of Patients’ Injuries. Kaiser Health News (KHN). Published January 31, 2020.Available at https://khn.org/news/medicare-punishment-hac-preeminent-hospitals-penalized-for-rates-of-patients-injuries-medicare-hospital-acquired-conditions-reduct. Published January 3, 2020
  5. National Library of Medicine. Estimating the Proportion of Healthcare-Associated Infections That Are Reasonably Preventable and the Related Mortality and Costs. National Library of Medicine. Available at https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21460463/. Accessed February, 2011.
  6. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Catheter-associated Urinary Tract Infections (CAUTI). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/hai/ca_uti/uti.html. Accessed March 30, 2020.
  7. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Antibiotic Resistance & Patient Safety Portal: Healthcare-Associated Infections. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Available at https://arpsp.cdc.gov/profile/infections. Accessed March 30, 2020.
  8. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Central Line-associated Bloodstream Infections: Resources for Patients and Healthcare Providers. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/hai/bsi/clabsi-resources.html. Page last reviewed: February 7, 2011
  9. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Bloodstream Infection Event. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/nhsn/pdfs/pscmanual/4psc_clabscurrent.pdf. Page last reviewed: January 2020
  10. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Vital signs: central line-associated blood stream infections—United States, 2001, 2008, and 2009. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2011;60(8):243-248
  11. Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) Healthcare-Associated Infections: A Compendium of Prevention Recommendations. Available at https://www.guidelinecentral.com/share/pocketcard/53d67314007df/#ifc7c9a35. Copyright 2014. (PDF file)
  12. National Library of Medicine. Risk Factors for Surgical Site Infection. National Library of Medicine. Available at https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/16834549/. Accessed 2006. PMID: 16834549 DOI: 10.1089/sur.2006.7.s1-7
  13. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. What is C. diff. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/cdiff/what-is.html. Accessed April 6, 2020.
  14. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Antibiotic Resistant Threats in the United States. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/drugresistance/pdf/threats-report/2019-ar-threats-report-508.pdf. Published December 2019. Accessed April 15, 2020.
  15. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Information for Clinicians about C. diff. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/cdiff/clinicians/index.html Accessed April 6, 2020.
  16. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Clinicians: Information about CRE. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/hai/organisms/cre/cre-clinicians.html. Page last reviewed: November 13,2019
  17. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/hai/organisms/cre/index.html. Accessed April 6, 2020.
  18. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. General Information. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/mrsa/community/index.html. Page last reviewed: June 26, 2019
  19. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Healthcare Settings. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/mrsa/healthcare/index.html. Accessed April 15, 2020.

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